There is nothing I can look at for very long, except the sea.
perspicious:


WHAT IS IT?
Most people feel anxious and worried from time to time when faced with certain situations such as taking an exam, speaking in public or going for a job interview. At times, a certain level of anxiety can help people feel alert and focused.
People with GAD, however, feel anxious and worried most of the time, not just in times of exceptional stress, and these worries interfere with their normal lives. Their worries may relate to any aspect of everyday life, including work, health, family and/or financial issues, even if there’s no real reason to worry about them. Even minor matters, such as household chores, can become the focus of anxiety and lead to uncontrollable worries and a feeling that something terrible will happen.WHAT ARE THE SIGNS/SYMPTOMS?
A person may have GAD if the specific signs and symptoms are present for six months or more (and on more days than not). This includes excessive worrying to the point that everyday activities like working, studying or socialising, are hard to carry out.
People with GAD may have related disorders, most commonly depression, social phobia (characterised by avoidance of social situations) and panic disorder. They may also misuse alcohol or drugs and may experience a range of physical health problems such as headaches, irritable bowel syndrome or heart disease.
If you believe that you or a loved one has GAD, please see your doctor. Do not self-diagnose.HOW COMMON IS IT & WHO EXPERIENCES IT?
The condition appears to affect more women than men. It can occur at any time in life and is common in all age groups, including children and older people.
Many people with GAD are not able to identify the precise cause of their concerns but are aware that having a tendency to worry has existed for a long time, often describing themselves as having always been ‘a worrier’.
Worries often found in children with GAD typically revolve around school, sporting events, punctuality, natural disasters or war. Behaviours that sometimes accompany GAD include:
• Being over-conforming
• Being a perfectionist
• Being unsure of oneself
• Needing to re-do tasks
• Seeking regular and frequent approval and assurance from parents, teachers, siblings or friends
• Asking “Yes but, what if…?”
Adolescents who experience GAD have a tendency to see small problems as catastrophes. Despite some symptoms typically presenting in childhood, the disorder appears to develop more fully in adolescence.

                                                                                                                 DOWNLOAD GENERALISED ANXIETY DISORDER FACT SHEETCREDIT [X]

perspicious:

WHAT IS IT?

Most people feel anxious and worried from time to time when faced with certain situations such as taking an exam, speaking in public or going for a job interview. At times, a certain level of anxiety can help people feel alert and focused.

People with GAD, however, feel anxious and worried most of the time, not just in times of exceptional stress, and these worries interfere with their normal lives. Their worries may relate to any aspect of everyday life, including work, health, family and/or financial issues, even if there’s no real reason to worry about them. Even minor matters, such as household chores, can become the focus of anxiety and lead to uncontrollable worries and a feeling that something terrible will happen.


WHAT ARE THE SIGNS/SYMPTOMS?

A person may have GAD if the specific signs and symptoms are present for six months or more (and on more days than not). This includes excessive worrying to the point that everyday activities like working, studying or socialising, are hard to carry out.

People with GAD may have related disorders, most commonly depression, social phobia (characterised by avoidance of social situations) and panic disorder. They may also misuse alcohol or drugs and may experience a range of physical health problems such as headaches, irritable bowel syndrome or heart disease.

If you believe that you or a loved one has GAD, please see your doctor. Do not self-diagnose.


HOW COMMON IS IT & WHO EXPERIENCES IT?

The condition appears to affect more women than men. It can occur at any time in life and is common in all age groups, including children and older people.

Many people with GAD are not able to identify the precise cause of their concerns but are aware that having a tendency to worry has existed for a long time, often describing themselves as having always been ‘a worrier’.

Worries often found in children with GAD typically revolve around school, sporting events, punctuality, natural disasters or war. Behaviours that sometimes accompany GAD include:

Being over-conforming

Being a perfectionist

Being unsure of oneself

Needing to re-do tasks

Seeking regular and frequent approval and assurance from parents, teachers, siblings or friends

Asking “Yes but, what if…?”

Adolescents who experience GAD have a tendency to see small problems as catastrophes. Despite some symptoms typically presenting in childhood, the disorder appears to develop more fully in adolescence.

                                                                                                                 
DOWNLOAD GENERALISED ANXIETY DISORDER FACT SHEET
CREDIT [X]

swingsetindecember:

i wish more people said that being single is normal

and you’re not going to meet and marry someone

and that’s fine

and if marriage happens, it happens. and it’s not the next big ticket to check off in life’s checklist

because not everyone meets someone they want to marry. and that’s normal

you’re not broken or unfulfilled if you are single

“Just remember that sometimes, the way you think about a person isn’t the way they actually are.”

— John Green, Paper Towns (via psych-facts)

(via leafcrunchingdinosaur)

I should know better

I should know by now never to call my mother when I am looking for comfort from my anxiety.

I just called her on my walk to work so that I could “talk out” some of this anxiety that’s been in my system since last night, especially since I just had dailies with the Norway gig and it’s definitely OVER on Wednesday. So both of my freelance gigs are ending before the month is out and I’m FREAKING OUT about how I’m going to pay my bills.

No sooner do I call her and tell her all of this and my fears about being able to support myself and she says, “I’ll always support you, just not financially.”

And I’m like… okay, look, we both know that I’m freaking out right now so what I don’t need is for you to fan the flames of my anxiety.  She could have just said, “I’ll always support you.” FULL STOP and worry about my asking her for money IF it comes to that. Instead, she decided to take the exact fear I’m having and just add a little extra worry to it. 

Yeah, my mother still helps me sometimes with money. It’s tough when you work three jobs and 82 hours a week but you don’t get paid for two of those three jobs until up to six weeks later. Sometimes, she floats me grocery money so that I can eat. I acknowledge that I’m goddamned LUCKY that I have a mother and that I have a mother who will help me sometimes.

But I wasn’t asking for a handout. I was asking for reassurance and comfort.

Running on fear

Still have the anxiety feeling, woke up with it. I keep telling myself that it will be ok but the anxiety part of my brain does not believe me.

It wants to go down the road of the future where I have no money and no job prospects and I’ll have to cancel my trip to see my sister. I don’t know what to do.

The other part of my brain just wants to go to sleep. No part of me wants to do work.

Puke

I just found out that one of my freelance jobs is ending in two weeks. Part if me is like, “good” but the other half is freaking out. What am I going to do for money?

I have such anxiety right now I feel like I could puke. I keep telling myself, it’ll be ok, I’ll find something else, but the realistic part knows that I won’t. These jobs were luck handed to me by the kindness of others.

I am all queazy.

Search
Navigate
Archive

Text, photographs, quotes, links, conversations, audio and visual material preserved for future reference.

Likes

A handpicked medley of inspirations, musings, obsessions and things of general interest.